Author: Crissie Brown

Morning Feature: Getting to Yes, Part II – Yes, But…

Principled negotiation sounds great in theory. But what if the other side have more power, insist on positional bargaining, or play dirty? (More) Getting to Yes, Part II – Yes, But… This week Morning Feature looks at the classic Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton of the Harvard Negotiation Project. Yesterday we looked at the problem of positional bargaining and the method of principled negotiation. Today we consider the most common objections to principled negotiation. Tomorrow we’ll review the debt ceiling deal through the lens of principled negotiation. As we saw yesterday, principled negotiation seeks a wise, efficient agreement that does not harm the parties’ relationship by separating the people from the problem, looking at interests rather than positions, inventing options for mutual gain, and seeking objective criteria to evaluate the options. That sounds great in theory, but negotiations don’t happen in theory. They happen in Realworldia, where the other side may not know how to or may choose not to negotiate well. The authors of Getting to Yes have heard those objections, and they discuss how to be a principled negotiator … even when the other side isn’t. What if they are more powerful? Develop your BATNA. Sometimes the other party in a negotiation seems to have more power. They have enough votes to block your ideal proposal. She’s the boss. He has...

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Campus Chatter – August 5, 2011

Today in history, greetings, and social banter here. (More) The Mayflower left Southampton, England today (1620). Also, John Peter Zenger was acquitted of seditious libel (1735), Cyrus West Field completed the first transatlantic telegraph cable (1858), the cornerstone for the Statue of Liberty was laid (1884), Cleveland, Ohio installed the first electric traffic light (1914), and American Bandstand debuted (1957). And President Ronald Reagan fired over 11,000 striking air traffic controllers (1981). +++++ The Janitor Professor of Astrology insists that this week’s Bippiescopes were only somewhat influenced by the upcoming state senate recall elections in Wisconsin…. Leo: A hunch is creativity trying to tell you to call voters in Wisconsin. Virgo: The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to call voters in Wisconsin. Libra: Early to bed, early to rise means you’ll have more time to call voters in Wisconsin. Scorpio: The mightiest oak was once a nut that took time to call voters in Wisconsin. Sagittarius: Better late than never, but better call voters in Wisconsin. Capricorn: Common horse sense is why common horses call voters in Wisconsin. Aquarius: Cogito ergo dico suffarigim. I think, therefore I call voters in Wisconsin. Pisces: Never mistake knowledge with the wisdom to call voters in Wisconsin. Aries: Man will occasionally stumble over truth, but just in case call voters in Wisconsin. Taurus: Advice is like kissing, so pucker up...

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Morning Feature: Getting to Yes, Part I – The Problem and the Method

We all negotiate, almost every day. Many of us think we’re good at it. Most of us are wrong. (More) Getting to Yes, Part I – The Problem and the Method This week Morning Feature looks at the classic Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton of the Harvard Negotiation Project. Today we look at the problem of positional bargaining and the method of principled negotiation. Tomorrow we’ll consider the most common objections to principled negotiation. Saturday we’ll review the debt ceiling deal through the lens of principled negotiation. First published in 1977, Getting to Yes is a standard text in negotiation as taught in law and business schools across the country. In their preface to the third edition, published in 2011, the authors contend that negotiation has become more important than ever as political, business, and social structures around the world grow less hierarchical. In a strict hierarchy, there is little need to negotiate. People make their pitches to the boss: the king, the owner, the father. The boss makes a decision and his decision is carried out. As JanF noted Tuesday in HEMMED In, Solomon could save the baby because he was the king. But in a democracy, a well-managed modern business, or a nurturing family, more people want input in decisions and more decisions must be reached by negotiation. The authors call...

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Campus Chatter – August 4, 2011

Today in history, greetings, and social banter here. (More) The Romans destroyed the second temple of Jerusalem today (70). Also, Dom Perignon did not invent champagne (1693), a tariff act created the Revenue Cutter Service, now the U.S. Coast Guard (1790), the Saturday Evening Post became a weekly newspaper (1821), Andrew and Abby Borden were found murdered (1892), and the U.S. Department of Energy was established (1977). And federal judge Vaughn Walker held that California Proposition 8 had no rational basis and violated the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment (2010). Good morning!...

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Campus Chatter – August 3, 2011

Today in history, greetings, and social banter here. (More) Bishop Grimketel canonized Saint Olaf today (1031). Also, Robert LaSalle built Le Griffon (1678), Harvard won the first Harvard-Yale Regatta (1852), Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis fined Standard Oil of Indiana $29.4 million for illegal rebating to freight carriers, later reversed (1907), Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis banned eight Chicago White Sox players for life, never reversed (1921), Jesse Owens won the 100m dash at the Berlin Olympics (1936), and the National Basketball Association was founded (1949). And the Senate began investigating the CIA’s MKULTRA mind-control program (1977). Good morning!...

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