The Eco News Roundup brings stories and commentary about issues related to climate change, renewable energy and the environment.


76 women on a glacier are changing the world

Heidi Steltzer’s job, as she puts it, is “hiking where no one else will go.” As a mountain and polar ecologist studying rare plants, she’s accustomed to traveling to breathtaking Arctic vistas to chase flora along mountain ridges.

Steltzer’s colleagues were more knowledgeable than your average gaggle of tourists. The travelers on her trip were all scientists, and several of them focus specifically on climate change. What’s more, her 75 companions on the three-week trip were all women, bound together on the largest-ever, all-female expedition to Antarctica. The trip was the focal point of a year-long leadership development program called Homeward Bound, which aims to groom 1,000 women with science backgrounds over the next ten years to influence public policy and dialogue.

Self-fueling boat sets off from Paris on 6-year world trip

PARIS (AP) — A boat that fuels itself is setting off around the world from Paris on a six-year journey that its designers hope will serves as a model for emissions-free energy networks of the future.

Energy Observer will use its solar panels, wind turbines and a hydrogen fuel cell system to power its trip. The 5 million-euro ($5.25 million) boat heads off Saturday from Paris toward the Atlantic.

Scotland sets renewable energy record as wind power provides equivalent of 118% of nation’s electricity

Wind power output in Scotland has helped set a new record for the first half of the year, according to an independent conservation group.

Analysis by WWF Scotland of data provided by WeatherEnergy found wind turbines provided around 1,039,001MWh of electricity to the National Grid during June.

How Distant Winds May Be Causing Antarctic Meltdown

Estimates of just how much sea levels will rise and inundate coastal areas vary widely. One of the reasons is that scientists just aren’t sure how quickly the vast ice sheets of Antarctica might melt into the sea because of the myriad triggers causing the ocean warming that is fueling that melt.

New research suggests one more unexpected culprit: Changing winds at one end of the continent could actually be setting off a series of changes, like a set of falling dominoes, that pushes warm water below the ice at the other end, thousands of miles away.

Sea level fears as Greenland darkens

Scientists are “very worried” that the melting of the Greenland ice sheet could accelerate and raise sea levels more than expected.
They say warmer conditions are encouraging algae to grow and darken the surface.

Dark ice absorbs more solar radiation than clean white ice so warms up and melts more rapidly.
Currently the Greenland ice sheet is adding up to 1mm a year to the rise in the global average level of the oceans.

Experts slam Trump administration’s flawed analysis for repealing water pollution rule

The economic analysis that the Trump administration is using to support its repeal of an Obama-era water pollution rule has serious flaws, economists and regulatory experts told Bloomberg BNA. And legal experts told ThinkProgress that relying on a flawed economic analysis could open the Trump administration up to serious legal problems down the road.

Economists warned that the data used in the analysis of repealing the Clean Water Rule both relies on outdated, recession-era economic data, and fails to accurately account for some of the benefits of leaving the rule in place. The Clean Water Rule, sometimes called the Waters of the United States Rule, was finalized in 2015 and clarified federal protection for millions of miles of streams and wetlands.

At BPI Campus our Progressive Agenda is:
1. People matter more than profits.
2. The earth is our home, not our trash can.
3. We need good government for both #1 and #2.

 

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