The resident faculty left an interesting t-shirt outside the mail room this morning. The staff are sure it was a clue…. (More)

First our thanks to last week’s writers:

On Monday, you shared your stories of offline political activism in Things We Did This Week and Linda Lee proposed Candidates’ Day: June 12, 2015 in Midday Matinee.

On Tuesday, the Squirrel noted The ‘Invisible’ Media Bias in Morning Feature and readers helped tell Tuesday’s Tale: Upgrade! in Midday Matinee.

On Wednesday, the Squirrel found Mixed Nuts Aplenty in Morning Feature and Linda Lee offered A Tale of Inventors in Midday Matinee.

On Thursday, the resident faculty began their series on The Greatest and Latest with “The Sugar Tit of History” in Morning Feature and triciawyse shared Fursdai Furries in Midday Matinee.

On Friday, the resident faculty continued their series on The Greatest and Latest with Glass Floors and Glass Ceilings in Morning Feature and triciawyse brought us Friedai Critters in Midday Matinee.

On the weekend, the resident faculty concluded their series on The Greatest and Latest with Change in the Wind in Saturday’s Morning Feature, Ms. Crissie was asked ‘Free Speech’ Whine and Cheese? in Sunday’s Morning Feature, and Winter B brought our weekly Eco News Roundup in Our Earth.

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Note: Please share your stories of offline political activism in Things We Did This Week.

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Thus we return to the t-shirt left outside the mail room as the resident faculty made their way from the wine cellar library where they spent the weekend drinking thinking on our motto of Magis vinum, magis verum (“More wine, more truth”) to the hot tub faculty lounge for their weekly game where the underwear goes flying planning conference:

“Hrmm,” Chef said as she brought out the decoder ring. “Should each Muslim apologize for all humans’ actions or only all Muslims’ actions?”

 photo SquirrelPecanRing.jpeg

The Squirrel’s eyes widened and he tapped at his Blewberry. “Were you listening outside the hot tub faculty lounge squirrel bath too?”

Chef shook her head as she scraped stray pecans into the Squirrel’s bowl. “This is hardly the resident faculty’s most obscure clue ever. In fact it’s pretty obvious.”

“True,” the Squirrel texted, “but they were also discussing this 2011 Public Religion Research Institute poll:”

More than 8-in-10 (83 percent) Americans say that self-proclaimed Christians who commit acts of violence in the name of Christianity are not really Christians, compared to only 13 percent who say that these perpetrators really are Christians. In contrast, less than half (48 percent) of Americans say that self-proclaimed Muslims who commit acts of violence in the name of Islam are not really Muslims, compared to 44 percent who say that these perpetrators really are Muslims.

There are no large differences between Republicans (10 percent), Democrats (17 percent) and independents (14 percent) in views of whether a self-identified Christian who commits acts of violence in the name of Christianity is really Christian. However, there are significant partisan differences in views about whether a self-identified Muslim who commits acts of violence in the name of Islam is really Muslim. A majority (55 percent) of Republicans say that such a person is Muslim, compared about 4-in-10 Democrats (40 percent) and independents (39 percent). Majorities of Democrats (51 percent) and independents (53 percent) disagree that a self-identified Muslim who commits acts of violence is really Muslim.

“Ahh,” Chef said. “That explains why Rupert Murdoch tweeted that all Muslims must be held responsible for last week’s attacks in Paris.”

The Squirrel nibbled a pecan and nodded. “I saw that. He got some interesting responses.”

“But it’s not all chuckles,” the Squirrel texted. “Consider this analysis by Maha Hilal, who designed that t-shirt:”

While politicians and Islamophobes alike continue to pressure the Muslim community into nonsensical apologies based on a homogenized identity, many Muslims have, unfortunately, internalized the narrative of collective responsibility, leading them to issue condemnations of acts of violence and terrorism based only on the fact that we share one piece of our identity. Coupled with the ever present voice of those calling for Muslims to speak out against Muslim terrorists, those who have stepped up to this plate, have not presented a counter-narrative as they purport, but rather an internalization of the dominant narrative where Muslims are guilty until proven innocent. Most ripe in this sense is Frantz Fanon’s quote in which he states the following: “The most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.”

“So this week the resident faculty will discuss why calls for collective guilt are always applied to Those People?” Chef asked.

The Squirrel nodded and tapped at his Blewberry. “And why conservatives are more likely to call for collective guilt … unless the perpetrators are People Like Us.”

But we’re not conservative, so their People Like Us are our Those People.

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Happy Monday!