The Eco News Roundup brings stories and commentary about issues related to climate change, renewable energy and the environment.

G20 continue to prop up fossil fuel industry

As the G20 meet this week, a report by the Overseas Development Institute and Oil Change International says they are failing to meet pledges to phase out support for fossil fuels. The ODI’s Shelagh Whitley talks to DW.

Global summit seeks to protect biodiverse areas

The World Parks Congress is underway in Sydney. The global gathering, from November 12-19, aims to set the agenda for protecting the most valuable areas on Earth over the next 10 years.

Kell: ‘Climate change is bad for business’

One thousand companies as well as investment powerhouses such as BlackRock and BT Pension and the Rockefeller and Rothschild funds are pushing for a global carbon deal. UN Global Compact founder Georg Kell tells DW why.

Lightning expected to increase by 50 percent with global warming

Today’s climate models predict a 50 percent increase in lightning strikes across the United States during this century as a result of warming temperatures associated with climate change. Reporting in the Nov. 14 issue of the journal Science, University of California, Berkeley, climate scientist David Romps and his colleagues look at predictions of precipitation and cloud buoyancy in 11 different climate models and conclude that their combined effect will generate more frequent electrical discharges to the ground.

Ocean primed for more El Niño: ANU media release

The ocean is warming steadily and setting up the conditions for stronger El Niño weather events, a new study has shown. A team of US, Australian, and Canadian researchers sampled corals from a remote island in Kiribati to build a 60-year record of ocean surface temperature and salinity.

“The trend is unmistakeable, the ocean’s primed for more El Niño events,” says lead-author Dr Jessica Carilli, now based at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Researchers calculate ‘hidden’ emissions in traded meat

An international team of researchers has, for the first time, estimated the amount of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) that countries release into the atmosphere when producing meat from livestock, and assigned the emissions to the countries where the meat is ultimately consumed. They found that embodied, or “hidden,” emissions in beef, chicken and pork have increased by 19% over the past 20 years, and that there is currently a global instability caused by a large number of countries contributing to the production of emissions in another country.

Russia was singled out as the biggest importer of embodied emissions in meat over that period, consuming more emissions than it produced, and receiving the majority of its emissions from Brazil and Argentina. The researchers also revealed substantial internal trade flows of emissions between European countries.

A sea change for marine conservation

Harnessing ‘people power’ to manage fisheries in the developing world has significantly benefited local communities and coral reefs, according to new research. “Studies about the environment, and particularly fisheries, abound with bad news, but here, we see a glimmer of hope,” says lead author Professor Joshua Cinner, from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University.

Historically, fisheries management in East Africa has followed a ‘top down’ approach, but in 2006, the Kenyan government introduced a pilot program that gave communities the ability to develop and enforce their own fisheries rules and regulations.

 

At BPI Campus our Progressive Agenda is:
1. People matter more than profits.
2. The earth is our home, not our trash can.
3. We need good government for both #1 and #2.

 

.

Reader Comments Welcome. Share Eco News stories you have seen here…please be sure to attribute them. Comments with violations of Fair Use guidelines may be edited.