The resident faculty left this note outside the mail room: “Cows look happy for mooing the morning signal echoing in pastures the rooster’s noise wakes.”

We hope it was a clue. (More)

First our thanks to last week’s writers:

On Monday, you shared your stories of offline political activism in Things We Did This Week and addisnana shared An Army Hug in Midday Matinee.

On Tuesday, Winning Progressive offered a Guide to 2012 State Ballot Initiatives: Part 1 in Morning Feature, the Squirrel ranted on Beyond Incompetence in Furthermore!, and you helped tell Tuesday’s Tale: The Universal Dump Truck in Midday Matinee.

On Wednesday, Winning Progressive concluded the Guide to 2012 State Ballot Initiatives: Part 2 in Morning Feature, the Squirrel mused On Polls and Skewers in Furthermore!, and addisnana offered A Cautionary Tale in Midday Matinee.

On Thursday, we began a series on Pew Research polling with Views From the Pews, Part I: What’s News? in Morning Feature and triciawyse shared Fursdai Furries in Midday Matinee.

On Friday, we continued our series on Pew Research polling with Our Changing Faces in Morning Feature and triciawyse brought us Frieday Critters in Midday Matinee.

On the weekend, we concluded our series on Pew Research polling with Election Issues and Coverage in Saturday’s Morning Feature, Ms. Crissie was asked about A Can of Whoopi? in Sunday’s Morning Feature, and Winning Progressive brought us Weekend Reading in Furthermore!.

Note: Please share your stories of offline political activism in Things We Did This Week.

That leaves the note from the resident faculty, found outside the mail room as they made their way from the wine cellar library where they spent the weekend drinking thinking on our motto of Magis vinum, magis verum (“More wine, more truth”) to the hot tub faculty lounge for their weekly game where the underwear goes flying planning conference. That note read:

Cows look happy for mooing the morning signal echoing in pastures the rooster’s noise wakes.

Chef predicted that this clue would be easy to decipher once we rooted through several books on cryptography. The Professor of Astrology Janitor predicted the key would be found in World War II-era BBC broadcasts with coded messages like “John has a long moustache” sent to Allied underground units in occupied Europe.

Your lowly mail room clerk made no prediction, as the Squirrel was already busy searching for an online sentence unscrambler. After much agitated chittering and more than a bit of angry tail-flicking, he finally texted “I can’t find an online sentence unscrambler. There are dozens listed but they’re all bad links.”

“Ahh,” the Professor of Astrology Janitor said. “The internet has a very low signal-to-noise ratio.”

“Well duh!” Chef exclaimed. “Let me see that note again.”

Your lowly mail room clerk passed it to her, and she quickly went to work with a red pen. When she handed the note back, it read:

Cows look happy for mooing the morning signal echoing in pastures the rooster’s noise wakes.

Your lowly mail room clerk then predicted that the resident faculty would discuss Nate Silver’s new book, The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail – But Some Don’t.

The rest of the staff agreed our prediction seemed very likely. If not, listen for cows and roosters.

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Happy Monday!