The Eco News Roundup brings stories and commentary about issues related to climate change, renewable energy and the environment.


Bakken Shale-Oil Drilling and Flaring Lights Up the Night Sky

Our friends at NOAA’s National Geophysical Data Center provided us with this very interesting satellite image composite of the upper Midwest, made from nighttime satellite images collected by the U.S. Air Force’s Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. State outlines are superimposed on the image:

See Also: The Bakken from space

Great Lakes ice coverage falls 71 percent over 40 years, researcher says

Great Lakes ice coverage declined an average of 71 percent over the past 40 years, according to a report from the American Meteorological Society.

Power Grid Must Adapt To Handle Renewable Energy

The National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C., once asked its members to pick the greatest engineering achievement ever.

Coal Power Drops Below 40% of U.S. Electricity, Lowest in 33 Years

The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported on Friday:
… coal’s share of monthly power generation in the United States dropped below 40% in November and December 2011. The last time coal’s share of total generation was below 40% for a monthly total was March 1978. A combination of mild weather (leading to a drop in total generation) and the increasing price competitiveness of natural gas relative to coal contributed to the drop in coal’s share of total generation.

March Madness: ‘This May Be An Unprecedented Event Since Modern U.S. Weather Records Began In The Late 19th Century’

March Heat Records Hit Incredible Ratio of 35 to 1 vs. Cold Records, Must-See Weather Channel Video Explains Link to Global Warming

As natural gas production grows, questions arise about methane leaks

WASHINGTON — As natural gas production in the United States hits an all-time high, a major unanswered question looms: What does growing hydraulic fracturing mean for climate change?

U.S. intelligence: Looming water woes will add to global instability

WASHINGTON — Floods and water shortages in the next 30 years will make it hard for many countries to keep up with growing demand for fresh water, particularly in South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, the U.S. intelligence community reported Thursday.

Everglades may get boost from lawmakers

A year after slashing Everglades funding, Florida lawmakers appear poised to give some back.

A recognised success for the 6th World Water Forum which gathered more than 35,000 participants in Marseille

After these six days of debates and exchanges, built on 1,400 solutions for water and sanitation posted on the solutions sharing platform, all the stakeholders (UN agencies, governments, parliamentarians, local authorities, donors, water professionals, NGOs and civil society actors, women and youth representatives) have already announced more than a hundred concrete commitments.

MIT research: Study finds room to store CO2 underground

A new study by researchers at MIT shows that there is enough capacity in deep saline aquifers in the United States to store at least a century’s worth of carbon dioxide emissions from the nation’s coal-fired powerplants. Though questions remain about the economics of systems to capture and store such gases, this study addresses a major issue that has overshadowed such proposals.

Past in monsoon changes linked to major shifts in Indian civilizations

A fundamental shift in the Indian monsoon has occurred over the last few millennia, from a steady humid monsoon that favored lush vegetation to extended periods of drought, reports a new study led by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). The study has implications for our understanding of the monsoon’s response to climate change.


Here are some other links you may find worthwhile:
Climate Change News Digest
Climate Progress from Center for American Progress
Rocky Mountain Institute “an independent, entrepreneurial nonprofit think-and-do tank™ that drives the efficient and restorative use of resources.”


At BPI Campus our Progressive Agenda is:
1. People matter more than profits.
2. The earth is our home, not our trash can.
3. We need good government for both #1 and #2.

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