Well, I have great news. The babies, Nancy and Michelle, love music. Mrs. Squirrel sang “There’s a Nut at the Bottom of the Tree” to them last night, and the girls’ eyes lit up like magic. Regis, formerly known as the baby, sang along. I even joined in. I lost it when Mrs. Squirrel got to “There’s a mote on the speck in the tail of the squirrel with her paws on the nut at the bottom of the tree.” Regis kept up for another verse or two.

Mrs. Squirrel has a great memory for song lyrics. I remember a lot of them, but she remembers every word. In fact, I think that’s one reason we have music. How many children learned their alphabet by singing the ABCs, or the Preamble to the Constitution by singing along with Schoolhouse Rock? Lyrics often use rhyme to make them more memorable, but poems also rhyme and most of us don’t remember poetry as well. There’s something about the act of singing along. We not only repeat the words. The act of singing also makes us feel something about those words. That’s especially true when we sing together. That’s why humans often sing church, and why professional musicians often have at least one sing-along number in a concert.

With that in mind, I’d like to offer this for the Occupy Movement, from Wall Street to Oakland to London to Melbourne:

To help you sing along, here are the lyrics:

You don’t know me but I’m your brother
I was raised here in this living hell
You don’t know my kind in your world
Fairly soon the time will tell
You, telling me the things you’re gonna do for me
I ain’t blind and I don’t like what I think I see

Takin’ it to the streets
Takin’ it to the streets
Takin’ it to the streets
Takin’ it to the streets

Take this message to my brother
You will find him everywhere
Wherever people live together
Tied in poverty’s despair
You, telling me the things you’re gonna do for me
I ain’t blind and I don’t like what I think I see

Takin’ it to the streets
Takin’ it to the streets
Takin’ it to the streets
Takin’ it to the streets

I’m going to sing that to the girls. They’re still too young to leave our tree. Maybe they won’t understand the message yet. And I don’t have as good a voice as Michael McDonald. But I think they’ll like it. So sing along with me … or better yet … take it to the streets.

Good day and good nuts.