The Eco News Roundup brings stories and commentary about issues related to climate change, renewable energy and the environment.


NIH launches research program to explore health effects from climate change

A new research program funded by the National Institutes of Health will explore the role that a changing climate has on human health. Led by NIH’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the program will research the risk factors that make people more vulnerable to heat exposure; changing weather patterns; changes in environmental exposures, such as air pollution and toxic chemicals; and the negative effects of climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts.

Al Gore: clear proof that climate change causes extreme weather

Al Gore has warned that there is now clear proof that climate change is directly responsible for the extreme and devastating floods, storms and droughts that displaced millions of people this year.

Scottish nuclear fuel leak ‘will never be completely cleaned up’

Radioactive contamination that leaked for more than two decades from the Dounreay nuclear plant on the north coast of Scotland will never be completely cleaned up, a Scottish government agency has admitted.

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (Sepa) has decided to give up on its aim of returning the seabed near the plant to a “pristine condition”. To do so, it said, could cause “more harm than good”.

Beer company threatens Tibetan antelope

A promotion for the world’s best-selling beer encroaches on the protected breeding ground of the Tibetan antelope, according to Chinese conservationists who are campaigning against the commercial exploitation of one of the planet’s most unique nature reserves.

What does a glacier sound like?

An anthropologist from Harvard, who has made a collection of awe-inspiring sounds, says it is like ‘the belly of the Earth groaning’

So what does a glacier sound like? Spray said she captured a collection of sounds, from the sharp crack of falling ice to the gurgling sounds of trapped water.

What happens if the population forecasts are wrong?

In a mere half-century, the number of people on the planet has soared from 3 billion to 7 billion, placing us squarely in the midst of the most rapid expansion of world population in our 50,000-year history — and placing ever-growing pressure on the Earth and its resources.

But that is the past. What of the future? Leading demographers, including those at the United Nations and the U.S. Census Bureau, are projecting that world population will peak at 9.5 billion to 10 billion later this century and then gradually decline as poorer countries develop. But what if those projections are too optimistic?

Orkney Islands provide a glimpse of a renewable future

Cutting-edge wave and tidal technology is regenerating island communities, bringing new jobs and new skills

Iranian greens fear disaster as Lake Orumieh shrinks

The fate of a shrinking salt lake is the last thing you would expect football fans to chant about – but Iranians are doing all they can to stop a looming ecological disaster.

Lake Orumieh in north-west Iran, one of the world’s largest salt lakes and a Unesco biosphere reserve, is disappearing due to drought and government mismanagement, and has become a major cause of concern for environmental activists and ordinary people in the Islamic republic.

Fracking stirs controversy in South Africa

A controversial method for extracting natural gas — hydraulic fracturing or ‘fracking’ — is stirring an environmental and property rights debate in South Africa.

The controversy stems from concerns over the safety of the technology, which uses large amounts of clean water mixed with sand and various chemicals to crack the rocks underground to release the gas. Various reports from the United States — where the method has spread widely over the past decade — suggest that the method pollutes water supplies, potentially endangering local environments and people’s health.

EU bans GM-contaminated honey from general sale

The European Union’s highest court on Tuesday ruled that honey which contains trace amounts of pollen from genetically modified (GM) corn must be labelled as GM produce and undergo full safety authorisation before it can be sold as food.

In what green groups are calling a “groundbreaking” ruling, the decision could force the EU to strengthen its already near-zero tolerance policy on genetically modified organisms (GMOs).


Here are some other links you may find worthwhile:
Climate Change News Digest
Climate Progress from Center for American Progress
Rocky Mountain Institute “an independent, entrepreneurial nonprofit think-and-do tank™ that drives the efficient and restorative use of resources.”


At BPI Campus our Progressive Agenda is:
1. People matter more than profits.
2. The earth is our home, not our trash can.
3. We need good government for both #1 and #2.

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