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Furthermore! – DNC Day Two: Challenge, Change, and Choice

September 6, 2012

Furthermore

Furthermore! – DNC Day Two: Challenge, Change, and Choice

President Obama, Democrats, and hardworking Americans faced enormous challenges over the past four years. We’ve made changes happen. Now choices remain. (More)

I’d grump that the Faculty Senate didn’t send me to cover the Democratic National Convention so I’m having to watch it on TV, but that would distract me from grumping about getting too little sleep. President Clinton’s brilliant speech ended in the wee hours of Squirrel Standard Time. At least Chef greeted me this morning with a thimbleful of espresso, for which I was very grateful. Here are my highlights from last night’s speeches:

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka offered an important distinction, and asked for us to do something profoundly important:

Last week, Mitt Romney told us that he and his friends built America – without any help from the rest of us. Well, let me tell you, Mitt Romney doesn’t know a thing about hard work or responsibility. We are the ones who built America. We are the ones who build it every single day—because it is our work that connects us all.

Look around this convention, at all the hard-working men and women who make this place run – the ones keeping us safe, serving our food, driving our buses, and cleaning up after the party’s over. When we go home tonight, the workers will be mopping and vacuuming, and picking up our trash. So when you have a chance, thank a worker!

Sister Simone Campbell, one of the “Nuns on the Bus,” also spoke to the challenges facing hardworking Americans across the nation:

During our journey, I rediscovered a few truths. First, Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan are correct when they say that each individual should be responsible. But their budget goes astray in not acknowledging that we are responsible not only for ourselves and our immediate families. Rather, our faith strongly affirms that we are all responsible for one another.

I am my sister’s keeper. I am my brother’s keeper. While we were in Toledo, I met 10-year-old twins Matt and Mark, who had gotten into trouble at school for fighting. Sister Virginia and the staff at the Padua Center took them in when they were suspended and discovered on a home visit that these 10-year-olds were trying to care for their bedridden mother who has MS and diabetes.

They were her only caregivers. The sisters got her medical help and are giving the boys some stability. Now the boys are free to claim much of the childhood they were losing. Clearly, we all share responsibility for the Matts and Marks in our nation.

In Milwaukee, I met Billy and his wife and two boys at St. Benedict’s dining room. Billy’s work hours were cut back in the recession. Billy is taking responsibility for himself and his family, but right now without food stamps, he and his wife could not put food on their family table.

We all share responsibility for creating an economy where parents with jobs earn enough to take care of their families. In order to cut taxes for the very wealthy, the Romney-Ryan budget would make it even tougher for hard-working Americans like Billy to feed their families. Paul Ryan says this budget is in keeping with the values of our shared faith. I simply disagree.

In Cincinnati, I met Jini, who had just come from her sister’s memorial service. When Jini’s sister Margaret lost her job, she lost her health insurance. She developed cancer and had no access to diagnosis or treatment. She died unnecessarily. That is tragic. And it is wrong.

The Affordable Care Act will cover people like Margaret. We all share responsibility to ensure that this vital health care reform law is properly implemented and that all governors expand Medicaid coverage so no more Margarets die from lack of care. This is part of my pro-life stance and the right thing to do.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi talked about the successes that President Obama and Democrats built together:

Democrats believe in reigniting the American dream by removing barriers to success and building ladders of opportunity for all, so that everyone can succeed. Jobs are central to the—American dream—and President Obama has focused on Jobs from day one. Under President Obama, we’ve gone from loosing 800,000 jobs a month to adding 4.5 million private sector jobs over the last 29 months. The American dream is about freedom. Jobs mean freedom for workers to support their families.

DREAMer Benita Veliz spoke of how President Obama has worked to make the American Dream possible for her and others like her:

I graduated as valedictorian of my class at the age of 16 and earned a double major at the age of 20. I know I have something to contribute to my economy and my country. I feel just as American as any of my friends or neighbors.

But I’ve had to live almost my entire life knowing I could be deported just because of the way I came here.

President Obama fought for the DREAM Act to help people like me. And when Congress refused to pass it, he didn’t give up. Instead, he took action so that people like me can apply to stay in our country and contribute. We will keep fighting for reform, but while we do, we are able to work, study and pursue the American dream.

Sandra Fluke spoke movingly of how President Obama stood with her, and with all women, against Republican attacks:

In that America, your new president could be a man who stands by when a public figure tries to silence a private citizen with hateful slurs. Who won’t stand up to the slurs, or to any of the extreme, bigoted voices in his own party. It would be an America in which you have a new vice president who co-sponsored a bill that would allow pregnant women to die preventable deaths in our emergency rooms. An America in which states humiliate women by forcing us to endure invasive ultrasounds we don’t want and our doctors say we don’t need. An America in which access to birth control is controlled by people who will never use it; in which politicians redefine rape so survivors are victimized all over again; in which someone decides which domestic violence victims deserve help, and which don’t. We know what this America would look like. In a few short months, it’s the America we could be. But it’s not the America we should be. It’s not who we are.

We’ve also seen another future we could choose. First of all, we’d have the right to choose. It’s an America in which no one can charge us more than men for the exact same health insurance; in which no one can deny us affordable access to the cancer screenings that could save our lives; in which we decide when to start our families. An America in which our president, when he hears a young woman has been verbally attacked, thinks of his daughters – not his delegates or donors – and stands with all women. And strangers come together, reach out and lift her up. And then, instead of trying to silence her, you invite me here – and give me a microphone – to amplify our voice. That’s the difference.

Massachusetts Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren returned to the theme of hardworking Americans struggling in a system that favors billionaires and big corporations:

But for many years now, our middle class has been chipped, squeezed, and hammered. Talk to the construction worker I met from Malden, Massachusetts, who went nine months without finding work. Talk to the head of a manufacturing company in Franklin trying to protect jobs but worried about rising costs. Talk to the student in Worcester who worked hard to finish his college degree, and now he’s drowning in debt. Their fight is my fight, and it’s Barack Obama’s fight too.

People feel like the system is rigged against them. And here’s the painful part: they’re right. The system is rigged. Look around. Oil companies guzzle down billions in subsidies. Billionaires pay lower tax rates than their secretaries. Wall Street CEOs—the same ones who wrecked our economy and destroyed millions of jobs – still strut around Congress, no shame, demanding favors, and acting like we should thank them.

Anyone here have a problem with that? Well I do. I talk to small business owners all across Massachusetts. Not one of them – not one – made big bucks from the risky Wall Street bets that brought down our economy. I talk to nurses and programmers, salespeople and firefighters – people who bust their tails every day. Not one of them – not one – stashes their money in the Cayman Islands to avoid paying their fair share of taxes.

And then came The Big Dog, former President Bill Clinton’s brilliant rebuke of Republican lies that ultimately came down to simple numbers:

The Republican narrative is that all of us who amount to anything are completely self-made. One of our greatest Democratic Chairmen, Bob Strauss, used to say that every politician wants you to believe he was born in a log cabin he built himself, but it ain’t so.

We Democrats think the country works better with a strong middle class, real opportunities for poor people to work their way into it and a relentless focus on the future, with business and government working together to promote growth and broadly shared prosperity. We think “we’re all in this together” is a better philosophy than “you’re on your own.”

Who’s right? Well since 1961, the Republicans have held the White House 28 years, the Democrats 24. In those 52 years, our economy produced 66 million private sector jobs. What’s the jobs score? Republicans 24 million, Democrats 42 million!
[...]
The Recovery Act saved and created millions of jobs and cut taxes for 95% of the American people. In the last 29 months the economy has produced about 4.5 million private sector jobs. But last year, the Republicans blocked the President’s jobs plan costing the economy more than a million new jobs. So here’s another jobs score: President Obama plus 4.5 million, Congressional Republicans zero.
[...]
Now there are 250,000 more people working in the auto industry than the day the companies were restructured. Governor Romney opposed the plan to save GM and Chrysler. So here’s another jobs score: Obama two hundred and fifty thousand, Romney, zero.
[...]
Let’s talk about the debt. We have to deal with it or it will deal with us. President Obama has offered a plan with 4 trillion dollars in debt reduction over a decade, with two and a half dollars of spending reductions for every one dollar of revenue increases, and tight controls on future spending. It’s the kind of balanced approach proposed by the bipartisan Simpson-Bowles commission.

I think the President’s plan is better than the Romney plan, because the Romney plan fails the first test of fiscal responsibility: The numbers don’t add up.

It’s supposed to be a debt reduction plan but it begins with five trillion dollars in tax cuts over a ten-year period. That makes the debt hole bigger before they even start to dig out. They say they’ll make it up by eliminating loopholes in the tax code. When you ask “which loopholes and how much?,” they say “See me after the election on that.”

People ask me all the time how we delivered four surplus budgets. What new ideas did we bring? I always give a one-word answer: arithmetic.

Then President Clinton highlighted the choice for 2012:

My fellow Americans, you have to decide what kind of country you want to live in. If you want a you’re on your own, winner take all society you should support the Republican ticket. If you want a country of shared opportunities and shared responsibilities – a “we’re all in it together” society, you should vote for Barack Obama and Joe Biden. If you want every American to vote and you think its wrong to change voting procedures just to reduce the turnout of younger, poorer, minority and disabled voters, you should support Barack Obama. If you think the President was right to open the doors of American opportunity to young immigrants brought here as children who want to go to college or serve in the military, you should vote for Barack Obama. If you want a future of shared prosperity, where the middle class is growing and poverty is declining, where the American Dream is alive and well, and where the United States remains the leading force for peace and prosperity in a highly competitive world, you should vote for Barack Obama.

I love our country – and I know we’re coming back. For more than 200 years, through every crisis, we’ve always come out stronger than we went in. And we will again as long as we do it together. We champion the cause for which our founders pledged their lives, their fortunes, their sacred honor – to form a more perfect union.

If that’s what you believe, if that’s what you want, we have to re-elect President Barack Obama.

The challenges were enormous, but we’ve made real and meaningful changes under President Obama’s leadership. Now it’s time to secure those changes … and that choice.

Good day and good nuts.

3 Responses to “Furthermore! – DNC Day Two: Challenge, Change, and Choice”

  1. addisnana Says:

    Thanks for this summary. The only thing missing was virtual kleenex. I am moved to tears once again. I think a person would have to be heartless to not be moved by the compelling stories of what has been and can be done by us being each other’s keepers and working together.

  2. winterbanyan Says:

    This was a beautiful collection of some of the most important things that were said last night. Thank you, Squirrel. The DNC is making me once again proud to be an American, a people who work together, not against each other. A people who have never been content to say, “I have mine, screw you.”

    They have totally captured the American future I want for my children and their children.

    It is a beautiful future, for all the hard work it will entail. And it will entail hard work from all of us, not just the majority of us while the billionaires sit on their behinds reaping the rewards of all we do.

  3. MKSinSA Says:

    Nice wrap of the day. Gracias